Art Bytes

SCULPTURES FOR WINDRUSH GENERATION

 

To commemorate the Windrush generation, Hackney will unveil two sculptures next year.

Thomas Price, whose grandmother is from Jamaica, and Veronica Ryan, whose parents are from Montserrat, will do the sculptures.

Price, whose art focuses on issues of identity, will create a 9-foot statue using 3D scans of Hackney residents that he hopes will give black Britons “a sense of visibility, connectedness, belonging and an ownership of history that they’ve not been allowed to access fully.”

Ryan will create a series of large marble and bronze sculptures of Caribbean fruit and vegetables as a metaphor for the origins and movement of people. “Many fruit and vegetables have their origins in Asia, and Africa. The perception of origins, and belonging to specific places is an extended part of the conversation,” says Ryan.

The announcement of the sculptures comes amidst several controversial statues in the UK being removed by colleges and protesters participating in the now global Black Lives Matter movement.

Art Bytes

A mural in honour of reggae legends and dedicated to Studio One founder Clement Dodd was recently unveiled at Studio One Boulevard in Kingston.

Artist Errol Reid has painted a new mural on Beat Street.

Reggae Films in the Park will screen the Jamaican music documentary Inna De Yard, the Soul of Jamaica, at Emancipation Park in Kingston, Friday February 21, at 7 p.m.

Tomorrow is Jamaica Day 2020 with the theme: ‘Celebrating Jamaica…highlighting our Icons in the Arts, Agriculture and Technological Innovations.’ In honour of the day, schools are being asked to se

The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon.

Jamaican-born Brooklyn artist Michael Escoffery is being featured in the annual Harlem Fine Arts Show. An award-winning painter, Escoffery’s work focusses primarily on women.

Pages