Art Bytes

SCULPTURES FOR WINDRUSH GENERATION

 

To commemorate the Windrush generation, Hackney will unveil two sculptures next year.

Thomas Price, whose grandmother is from Jamaica, and Veronica Ryan, whose parents are from Montserrat, will do the sculptures.

Price, whose art focuses on issues of identity, will create a 9-foot statue using 3D scans of Hackney residents that he hopes will give black Britons “a sense of visibility, connectedness, belonging and an ownership of history that they’ve not been allowed to access fully.”

Ryan will create a series of large marble and bronze sculptures of Caribbean fruit and vegetables as a metaphor for the origins and movement of people. “Many fruit and vegetables have their origins in Asia, and Africa. The perception of origins, and belonging to specific places is an extended part of the conversation,” says Ryan.

The announcement of the sculptures comes amidst several controversial statues in the UK being removed by colleges and protesters participating in the now global Black Lives Matter movement.

Art Bytes

Three Jamaican artists will show their work at “The Island Imprint: The Art and History of the Caribbean Community in Broward County”, an art and historical exhibition from June 15th to

Kingston Creative’s monthly Artwalk festival experience goes virtual March 29th, thanks to  sponsors Sagicor, tTech and the Tourism Enhancement Fund.

Developed together with Steve Madden, the collection was designed for warm weather with the use of bright neon colors with rope, rhinestones, and buckle embellishments.

The work of photographer Nadine Ijewere is featured in the March 2020 issue of American Vogue.

Dr Rachel Moseley-Wood, head of the Department of Literatures in English at UWI, Mona recently launched her 254-page book, Show Us as We Are: Place, Nation and Identity in Jamaican Film.

Six students from the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts designed a mural to mark the starting line of the Sagicor Sigma Run in February.

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