Art Bytes

RENEE COX NEW YORK TIMES INTERVIEW

 

Renee Cox is one of nine black artists and cultural leaders the NY Times Style Magazine recently asked for their take on cultivating black audiences and dismantling historically white institutions.

Cox says she draws inspiration from never having been raised to feel like a victim or that she was lesser than anyone else. “They don’t fall into the stereotypes of black people that white people have created,” she said of her work, some of which has been exhibited in Jamaica.

“If you’re presenting black people as victims, that goes a longer way to the bank, but that doesn’t change the status quo of the power structure of racism (because racism is about power and economics). I have been more interested in upsetting that paradigm, in at least having the fantasy of having the power, if not the reality.”

Art Bytes

Jamaican Herb Robinson is one of 14 photographers in the Whitney Museum’s exhibition, Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop. The show chronicles the early work o

Camille Chedda has won a Stay Home Artist Residency, a five-month program that supports 24 cultural practitioners, artists and creative entrepreneurs.

The Windrush generation is in vogue again. Now a walkway on the Tilbury Bridge that they used on arrival in the UK, has been turned into an art installation to honour them.

Unbroken, the docu-film based on amputee Laron Williamson’s attempt to qualify for the Jamaican Paralympic team, won Best Documentary Short Film at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival.

The National Gallery’s flagship exhibition, Kingston Biennial, has been postponed because of Covid-19.

To commemorate the Windrush generation, Hackney will unveil two sculptures next year.

Pages