Art Bytes

HARPER’S BAZAAR’S FIRST BLACK EDITOR IN CHIEF

 

Harper’s Bazaar’s first ever black editor in chief has Caribbean parentage.

"As the proud daughter of a Lebanese father and Trinidadian mother, my worldview is expansive and is anchored in the belief that representation matters,” says Samira Nasr, who has held editing positions at Vanity Fair, Elle and InStyle magazines.

She says she hopes to "reimagine what a fashion magazine can be in today's world", particularly in light of current social upheaval spurred by the Black Lives Matter Movement in the US.

"My lens by nature is colourful, and so it is important to me to begin a new chapter in Bazaar's history by shining a light on all individuals who I believe are the inspiring voices of our time."

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