Jamaican Artist

Cecil Baugh

 
Cecil Baugh

In an era when pottery was still regarded as a lesser art form Cecil Baugh was a pioneer in educating Jamaican art lovers and gaining their respect for its fine art status. Cecil Baugh first developed an interest in clay making and ceramics as a young man living in Kingston. His first contact came through the Trenchfield sisters who lived in his Mountain View community. Originally from St Elizabeth, the sister made 'yabbas' in the traditional African way, and Baugh who had never seen these techniques in his home parish of Portland, became fascinated. He also recognized that making pots was a lucrative business, especially in the days before refrigeration when 'yabbas' were used for cool storage. Along with a fellow potter Wilfred Lord he established the Cornwall Works in Montego Bay, but later transferred to St Ann and then back to Kingston. Always innovative, Baugh worked to develop his techniques in pot making, experimenting with glazes and learning the intricacies of kiln firing to perfect his skills. Increasingly he moved further from the African tradition towards Western and Asian styles achieving his own distinctive coloured glazes.

Art Bytes

The Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art’s special exhibition on artistic achievements of early Caribbean civilizations opens December 16. Titled Arte del mar: Artistic Exchange in the Caribbean, the exhibition...

The winners of the Jamaica Visual Arts Competition’s first Youth Exhibition are now on display at the Jamaica Conference Centre, 14 – 20 Port Royal Street, Kingston through  January 31st, 2020. The...

Students from the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts have partnered with The Ministry of National Security to paint peace murals in Swallowfield. The murals contain words and images advocating...

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